• img_1112

    Asagiri Jam 2016

    A Red Fuji sunset, the Skatalites, and so much more!

    by Dave Frazier

    Japanese music fans variously refer to Asagiri Jam as “the real Fuji Rock”, “the festival with the original Fuji Rock idea” and “the Fuji Rock afterparty.” I was also told, “The music is not even that important, people just want to go there and hang out.”

    The 2-day event, which attracts around 10,000 every year, saw performances by the Skatalites, Todd Terje & the Olsens, Kurt Vile and the Violators, Floating Points, Toe and others bands, was held Oct. 8 and 9 on the lower slopes of Mount Fuji, and the main stage and camping area afford incredible views of the mountain when the weather cooperates. It is organized by Smash Japan, which also organizes Fuji Rock, and has been held in early October — about two and a half months after Fuji Rock — annually since 2001.


  • Bo Ningen at Fuji Rock 2013

    Laura’s Musical Marmite Sunday

    • July 19, 2016 ● Bands

    Fuji Rock offers a veritable cornucopia of musical delights, but when your taste in music tends towards the darker, screamier end of the spectrum it can seem like a little bit of a wasteland at times. Luckily, this year the line-up on Sunday promises a mix of the weird, wacky and wonderfully chuggy. Whether you like it or not will be another matter altogether, but pull up a camping chair and get comfy at the White Stage with me.


  • toothbrush

    Don’t forget your toothbrush


    With the fest mere days away now, regardless of how many times you’ve attended Fuji Rock, there’s always the chance you might forget something that could put a major damper on your experience. I put together a quick and easy top 10 list, something I call my top 10 Fuji Rock essentials. Show up to the festival with these items and everything should be all good. READ MORE

  • One good place to sit

    Not a Walkabout: Lots of Music Without Alot of Work


    Let’s be honest, you can probably have a pretty good festival just sitting on your ass in front of the Green Stage. By my estimation, a good number of people (dare we say the majority) actually do just this. On Friday, a nice lineup of Boredoms< Biffy Clyro < Jake Bugg< James Blake< and Sigur Ros aint a bad way to pass the day. Boredoms promise to bring an interesting drum arrangement and enough noise to "wake up the" the angry rock spirits inhabiting the Green Stage. Biffy Clyro close many festivals so this early afternoon spot is a bonus and Jake Bugg and James Blake are all around musicians who put on a nice groove. And when it gets dark, Sigur Ros, will bring a nice light show which can be enjoyed laying all the way back. The added bonus of sitting on your butt all day and into the late evening is you will have some extra energy for when the real fun starts which is after midnight at the Palace of Wonder. If you are panning to sit on your arse all day there's a good chance you will need to get up at some point to relieve yourself or get something to nibble on when your're feeling peckish. If this is the case, here are are some tips about bands you can check out, no more than 10-mins walking from that mud splattered tarp you left in front of the Green Stage. READ MORE

  • Rookie Round-up Day 3

    • July 18, 2016 ● Bands



    If you’re still full of beans after the Red Hot Chilli Peppers on Sunday night, here’s a run down of the bands playing the Rookie stage.


  • Naeba Shokudo

    Guide to the Small Stages: Naeba Shokudo

    • July 16, 2016 ● Bands

    Naeba Shokudo literally means “Naeba cafeteria.” The stage is a wooden deck at the back of a large noodle stall in the food court area. Most people encounter it while walking at night between the Green Stage and the Red Marquee as music coming from behind an improbably large clump of people half standing, half slipping on a miniature muddy-sloped ampitheater. It’s a little wall-less juke joint in the middle of the woods. Each night, 5 to 6 bands will perform from 6:45pm till 12:30am. They are (mostly) Japanese groups and tend to be well known professional performers — new or mid-range artists on major labels, TV personalities, veterans of esoteric club circuits, popular indie goups and so on. They also tend to be small, tight groups — hardly more than three people can fit on the stage — as well as upbeat purveyors of instant entertainment. In short, they’re a bunch of great acts who are too experienced for the Rookie-A-Go-Go, too raucous for Gypsy Avalon and for various reasons couldn’t fit on the festival’s bigger stages.


  • rookie-a-go-go

    Rookie Round-up Day 2

    • July 13, 2016 ● Bands


    Here’s your guide to Day 2 at the Rookie Stage!


  • fuji97

    Memories of the First Fuji Rock

    20th Anniversary Special: An Oral History of 1997

    By Dave Frazier
    This year we will celebrate the 20th ever Fuji Rock Festival. The first year, 1997, was legendary both as a triumph and a disaster. Held at the Tenjinyama Ski Resort on the slopes of Mt. Fuji, a typhoon struck during the first day’s headliner set by the Red Hot Chili Peppers, and the rest of the festival was cancelled. Several of the bands that performed that year will now return for Fuji Rock’s 20th anniversary, including headliners Red Hot Chili Peppers and three acts that never made it to the stage, Beck, Squarepusher and Lee “Scratch” Perry. Several other acts from Fuji Rock #1 have become Fuji Rock regulars, returning to the festival over and over again, such as Foo Fighters and Boredoms. Still more music legends were there behind the scenes, like The Clash’s lead singer Joe Strummer, who was a Fuji Rock regular till his death in 2002 and leaves us the marvelous legacy of the Palace of Wonder, which grew out of the campfire parking lot party he started in Naeba in 2000.


  • NST & The Soul Sauce 1

    Korean Reggae! Interview with NST & The Soul Sauce

    Or should that be the “Seoul” Sauce?

    Japan has had a strong reggae and ska scene for decades, and Fuji Rock has always been one of it’s major showcases. But Korean reggae? Yes, it exists. And now Fuji Rock has that too.


    NST & The Soul Sauce is an eight-piece band based in Seoul, South Korea, will make their first visit to Fuji Rock this year, playing on Saturday 7/23 at the Cafe de Paris (1pm) and Crystal Palace tent (3:15am).  Though the band was formed last year as a recording project for Korean recording industry veteran — and a man with a silky smooth voice — Noh Seon Teck, the sound they came up with had so much style and swagger they couldn’t just call it a day. So they kept going, gigging around Korea, and now making their first visit to Naeba. To find more about the band, the Korean reggae scene, and the state of Rastifarianism on the Korean peninsula, I caught up with the guys over email for this interview.


  • spsessions

    Jimmy’s Jazzy Sunday



    Allow me to kick off the start of a (possible) day curating series here at Fujirockers. Let us plan your day for you. We know the festival is massive and the lineup is daunting. Planning a day is often confusing and the lineup often conflicts. So, let us do the dirty work for you. This (possible) series is a way for us experienced Fujirockers to guide you through a day, taking you through which bands to see when and why.