• Kid in a swing couldn't be happier

    Bringing kids? Here’s 5 tips


    Kid in a swing couldn't be happier

    Kid in a swing couldn’t be happier

    My kids (Finn, aged 7) and Meara (aged, 2) perfectly bookend the kid spectrum at Fuji Rock. Any older and he may be too cool for Gorillaz and any younger they may not be able to keep down the curry at Queen Sheeba’s. Finn went to his first EDM show years before many of you even heard of the genre, checking out (Diplo, the better half of Major Lazer) when he was just 7 months in his mama’s belly. Here’s a few tips for you to have kidstravagant experience.

    1)Stay close to the food.
    That’s right, I’m swapping frequent trips to beer tent for non-stop food stall action this year. In fact, my whole geo-location and stage traveling itinerary is gonna be based around food stuffs. Oasis is gonna rock my world, and I would say the same for World Court but it’s transforming into something else this year? Basically, I’m planning on spending most of my time in a set of camping chairs at Green Stage parked high atop the amphitheater just near the trees and the wheelchair platform. This makes it a quick trip for transporting soba noodles, sausage on a stick, etc.
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  • Hyappa booth

    Meet Hyappa Brews


    Hyappa booth

    Wondering where to go for great craft beer and tasty grub this year? While I usually recommend a full stroll around the grounds to check things out for yourself, allow me to save you some time and steer you towards Aichi’s Hyappa brewing. They will have a booth at this year’s Fuji Rock for the 3rd consecutive year. I’ve personally enjoyed Hyappa’s great drinks and chow the past two years at Fuji Rock. I can say from experience, for those of us with discerning taste, the Hyappa booth is not to be missed. I’m sure you might have a few questions, like where can I find the booth, what are they serving up this year and what exactly is Hyappa brews all about? Well, fret not, I got a chance to chat with Hyappa head honcho Craig Morrey (pictured center with 2 thumbs up) to answer these questions and more. READ MORE

  • Day Dreaming And Silent Breeze: Should You Go?


    A taste of what you can expect off the beaten path

    A taste of what you can expect off the beaten path

    With the basic stage line-up for Fuji Rock 2017 laid out, punters can begin plotting out their days at Naeba. For the most part, the gathering is laid out in a line — one that curves and can reach out to the further edges of the ski resort, but a line nonetheless. Hitting up every stage is relatively easy and doesn’t require major detours.

    Well, except for one.

    The Day Dreaming and Silent Breeze stage rests far away from any other part of Fuji Rock, requiring a 20-minute gondola ride to get to the hill where it is located. Fest newbies might not be able to locate it on a map…and even veterans of the event might be hard-pressed to remember heading up there. With so much to take in, making time in your schedule to head off into the wilderness for the fest’s most far-flung spot might seem unnecessary.

    Yet it is totally worth it. Here are the main reasons we believe making the trek out is completely worth it.

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  • A Quick Look at Fuji Rock Musical Trends


     

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    Looking back on the years of Fuji Rock, it’s always interesting to look at trends or changes that have helped shape the festival’s vibe. For example, this year’s outing is anchored by the usual big-name headliners, but seems to be underlined by a stronger showing than ever before of young up-and-coming Japanese acts.

    Fuji Rock has always been known as a celebration of musical acts from all over the world, but the inclusion of more and more Japanese acts in recent years could be echoing the current rise in strength and influence of Japanese music around the world.

    Perhaps due to their presence on the world stage and travel from other countries to the festival, it’s still mainly the overseas artists invited to Fuji Rock that often end up getting top billing and taking the spotlight from equally famous Japanese artists appearing here. Taking into account the overall lineups recently however, this could be something that might push more Japanese acts into headliner status and transform the Fuji Rock experience in years to come.

    While that’s a gradual change that many festival goers are sure to be picking up on, this time I’d like to reflect back on previous years and perhaps start a discussion on some trends of past headlining acts.

    There will always be the veterans; Red Hot Chili Peppers, Beck, Foo Fighters, Noel Gallagher, as well as this year’s returnee Bjork are all very familiar faces to the Fuji Rock main-stage lineup over the years.

    Big names like these are sure to be a main draw for fans to return to the festival, but I think more credit goes to the variety that the main headlining acts showcase that ends up setting the core vibe of the festival each year.

    Of course, the appeal of the Fuji Rock experience lies with much more than the three to five big-name acts that appear on the main stage, but we do rely on headlining acts to close out each day and wow us with consistently over-the-top performances. What kind of role, though, do these top artists really play in drawing crowds to the festival? If we take a look at top-billed acts from previous years, are there perhaps any patterns that come to the surface?

    2016 Sigur Ros, Red Hot Chili Peppers, Beck

    2015 Foo Fighters, Muse, Noel Gallagher, Deadmaus

    2014 Franz Ferdinand, Arcade Fire, Jack Johnson

    2013 Nine Inch Nails, Bjork, The Cure

    2012 The Stone Roses, Noel Gallagher, Radiohead

    2011 Coldplay, The Faces, The Music, The Chemical Brothers

    2010 Muse, Roxy Music, Massive Attack

    The possibility of an interesting pattern or trend in headlining acts is just something to ponder, but do you notice any interesting artist combinations that had a major draw for you, or notice a particularly weak/strong/unusual or memorable year because of the main acts that appeared?

    Any trends or big changes to the festival (The end of the Orange Court?) or lineup (big-name artist cancellations?) over the years that had a big impact on you? We’d like to hear them too! Let us know in the comments.

    Photo by 粂井健太
    Text by Park Baker

  • Fujirockpic

    Why choose Fuji Rock?


    Fujirockpic

    A few days ago my colleague Sean touched on why music festivals matter, in this post I’m going to tell you why you should make Fuji Rock the one festival that matters the most. There are a number of ways you can spend your hard earned money and time this summer, so why choose Fuji Rock? The Japan summer festival season is impressive. There are loads of festivals and/or concerts you can attend, great bands and DJs you can take in every weekend this summer. READ MORE

  • Rocking it  all the way to  Green Stage

    Why Music Festivals Matter


    Rocker2259

    Festivals existed long before Woodstock discovered mud wrestling and are no different than regional events like tractor pulls and cake bakes which basically are around to mark the dull passage of time. Such events also serve to pair adolescents from similar socio-economic groups, hoping that courtship will end in copulation to propagate the culture of the dominant group and thereby continue traditions such as blueberry pies and mint juleps.

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  • img_1112

    Asagiri Jam 2016


    A Red Fuji sunset, the Skatalites, and so much more!

    by Dave Frazier

    Japanese music fans variously refer to Asagiri Jam as “the real Fuji Rock”, “the festival with the original Fuji Rock idea” and “the Fuji Rock afterparty.” I was also told, “The music is not even that important, people just want to go there and hang out.”

    The 2-day event, which attracts around 10,000 every year, saw performances by the Skatalites, Todd Terje & the Olsens, Kurt Vile and the Violators, Floating Points, Toe and others bands, was held Oct. 8 and 9 on the lower slopes of Mount Fuji, and the main stage and camping area afford incredible views of the mountain when the weather cooperates. It is organized by Smash Japan, which also organizes Fuji Rock, and has been held in early October — about two and a half months after Fuji Rock — annually since 2001.

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  • toothbrush

    Don’t forget your toothbrush


    toothbrush

    With the fest mere days away now, regardless of how many times you’ve attended Fuji Rock, there’s always the chance you might forget something that could put a major damper on your experience. I put together a quick and easy top 10 list, something I call my top 10 Fuji Rock essentials. Show up to the festival with these items and everything should be all good. READ MORE

  • One good place to sit

    Not a Walkabout: Lots of Music Without Alot of Work


    OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

    Let’s be honest, you can probably have a pretty good festival just sitting on your ass in front of the Green Stage. By my estimation, a good number of people (dare we say the majority) actually do just this. On Friday, a nice lineup of Boredoms < Biffy Clyro < Jake Bugg < James Blake < and Sigur Ros aint a bad way to pass the day. READ MORE

  • fuji97

    Memories of the First Fuji Rock


    20th Anniversary Special: An Oral History of 1997

    By Dave Frazier
    This year we will celebrate the 20th ever Fuji Rock Festival. The first year, 1997, was legendary both as a triumph and a disaster. Held at the Tenjinyama Ski Resort on the slopes of Mt. Fuji, a typhoon struck during the first day’s headliner set by the Red Hot Chili Peppers, and the rest of the festival was cancelled. Several of the bands that performed that year will now return for Fuji Rock’s 20th anniversary, including headliners Red Hot Chili Peppers and three acts that never made it to the stage, Beck, Squarepusher and Lee “Scratch” Perry. Several other acts from Fuji Rock #1 have become Fuji Rock regulars, returning to the festival over and over again, such as Foo Fighters and Boredoms. Still more music legends were there behind the scenes, like The Clash’s lead singer Joe Strummer, who was a Fuji Rock regular till his death in 2002 and leaves us the marvelous legacy of the Palace of Wonder, which grew out of the campfire parking lot party he started in Naeba in 2000.

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