• jshimabukuro2

    Jabbering with Jake


    In my last article I described one of the reasons to attend Fuji Rock this year was its great diversity of bands and acts at the Festival. One example of such diversity is Jake Shimabukuro. For those who don’t know, Jake is a 5th generation Japanese-American, Hawaiian born and bred, master of the ukulele. Before the internet was being broken by silly things like pictures of the Kardashians, our man Jake was shaking things up on Youtube with his super-human ukulele skills. If you still haven’t seen his rendition of ‘While My Guitar Gently Weeps’, join the 15 million others who have. 

    Jake was signed to Sony records Japan in 2001 and has been releasing records and playing shows here ever since. I caught his set at Tokyo’s Bunkamura a couple years back and was plenty impressed. This will be Jake’s fourth time to play Fuji Rock and he’ll be coming this time with his Nashville Sessions trio band, consisting of Nolan Verner on bass and Evan Hutchings on drums. If you somehow manage to miss Jake at this year’s Fuji Rock, he’ll be back in late September of this year playing a Japan tour. READ MORE

  • Line-up announcement. Lots of decisions!

    Stage line-ups announced, including POW, Gypsy Avalon, etc.

    Well the big news today is that the line-up for all of the stages has been announced. For me, it’s always a heartbreaking moment as I begin to make dreaded schedule decisions, writing off some bands that I would love to see but would be logistically impossible.

    For example, it’s gonna impossible to catch both Gorillaz (Green) and Queens of the Stone Age (White) on Friday night without running your ass around and being content with half-sets from each band. But then again,having an abundance of choice aint such a bad thing.

    Further complicating matters comes from the myriad of other stage announcements which came out today like Palace of Wonder, Naeba Shokudo, Mokudo Tei, Gypsy Avalon, Pyramid Stage, etc. All of these acts are worthy of your time and attention. But if you see have to see one act these stages, I think it’s gotta be Big Willy’s Burlesque This fella sure puts on a helluva show and really gets the place steaming.

    Let’s hear it from you…. who are you gonna see.. or to put it another way who are you gonna miss?

    Text: Sean

  • A Quick Look at Fuji Rock Musical Trends



    Looking back on the years of Fuji Rock, it’s always interesting to look at trends or changes that have helped shape the festival’s vibe. For example, this year’s outing is anchored by the usual big-name headliners, but seems to be underlined by a stronger showing than ever before of young up-and-coming Japanese acts.

    Fuji Rock has always been known as a celebration of musical acts from all over the world, but the inclusion of more and more Japanese acts in recent years could be echoing the current rise in strength and influence of Japanese music around the world.

    Perhaps due to their presence on the world stage and travel from other countries to the festival, it’s still mainly the overseas artists invited to Fuji Rock that often end up getting top billing and taking the spotlight from equally famous Japanese artists appearing here. Taking into account the overall lineups recently however, this could be something that might push more Japanese acts into headliner status and transform the Fuji Rock experience in years to come.

    While that’s a gradual change that many festival goers are sure to be picking up on, this time I’d like to reflect back on previous years and perhaps start a discussion on some trends of past headlining acts.

    There will always be the veterans; Red Hot Chili Peppers, Beck, Foo Fighters, Noel Gallagher, as well as this year’s returnee Bjork are all very familiar faces to the Fuji Rock main-stage lineup over the years.

    Big names like these are sure to be a main draw for fans to return to the festival, but I think more credit goes to the variety that the main headlining acts showcase that ends up setting the core vibe of the festival each year.

    Of course, the appeal of the Fuji Rock experience lies with much more than the three to five big-name acts that appear on the main stage, but we do rely on headlining acts to close out each day and wow us with consistently over-the-top performances. What kind of role, though, do these top artists really play in drawing crowds to the festival? If we take a look at top-billed acts from previous years, are there perhaps any patterns that come to the surface?

    2016 Sigur Ros, Red Hot Chili Peppers, Beck

    2015 Foo Fighters, Muse, Noel Gallagher, Deadmaus

    2014 Franz Ferdinand, Arcade Fire, Jack Johnson

    2013 Nine Inch Nails, Bjork, The Cure

    2012 The Stone Roses, Noel Gallagher, Radiohead

    2011 Coldplay, The Faces, The Music, The Chemical Brothers

    2010 Muse, Roxy Music, Massive Attack

    The possibility of an interesting pattern or trend in headlining acts is just something to ponder, but do you notice any interesting artist combinations that had a major draw for you, or notice a particularly weak/strong/unusual or memorable year because of the main acts that appeared?

    Any trends or big changes to the festival (The end of the Orange Court?) or lineup (big-name artist cancellations?) over the years that had a big impact on you? We’d like to hear them too! Let us know in the comments.

    Photo by 粂井健太
    Text by Park Baker

  • firstfujirock_5

    The Three Species of Fujirockers


    Fujirock has many sights and not the least of them is the people. The smiling crowds are invariably a wild mix of personalities, fashion and music tastes. However, after a few trips to the festival I find there are some broad categories that we can assign people to, based on how they approach the festival.


  • Shibuya-Kei Fans Rejoice: Cornelius And Kenji Ozawa

    The innovators of Shibuya-kei, Flipper's Guitar featured Kenji Ozawa and Keigo Oyamada (Cornelius)

    The innovators of Shibuya-kei, Flipper’s Guitar featured Kenji Ozawa and Keigo Oyamada (Cornelius)

    When the line-ups for each day of this year’s Fuji Rock Festival arrived, fans of Shibuya-kei got a surprise – Keigo Oyamada, better known by the name Cornelius, and Kenji Ozawa would be playing on the same day, Saturday. They were the core of the band Flipper’s Guitar, an outfit founded in the late 1980s that set the pace for one of Japan’s most exciting homegrown genres of the ’90s by taking ideas from obscure styles of music (Parisian pop, tropicalia records, all sorts of forgotten British bands) and introducing them to a new generation of listeners. The pair laid the way for artists such as Pizzicato Five, Fantastic Plastic Machine and Kahimi Karie to gain attention for a sound out of time – one so popular in the hip Shibuya district that it was called “Shibuya-kei.”


  • Fujirockpic

    Why choose Fuji Rock?


    A few days ago my colleague Sean touched on why music festivals matter, in this post I’m going to tell you why you should make Fuji Rock the one festival that matters the most. There are a number of ways you can spend your hard earned money and time this summer, so why choose Fuji Rock? The Japan summer festival season is impressive. There are loads of festivals and/or concerts you can attend, great bands and DJs you can take in every weekend this summer. READ MORE

  • Rocking it  all the way to  Green Stage

    Why Music Festivals Matter


    Festivals existed long before Woodstock discovered mud wrestling and are no different than regional events like tractor pulls and cake bakes which basically are around to mark the dull passage of time. Such events also serve to pair adolescents from similar socio-economic groups, hoping that courtship will end in copulation to propagate the culture of the dominant group and thereby continue traditions such as blueberry pies and mint juleps.


  • Never Young Beach

    The New Wave Of Japanese Rock At Fuji Rock 2017

    Never Young Beach

    Never Young Beach

    Although there remains just over two months before the 2017 edition of Fuji Rock kicks off, the poster for this year’s gathering has come together quite nicely. A few stories become clear within its somewhat trippy illustrations — Shibuya-kei cornerstones Cornelius and Kenji Ozawa appear on the same day; a healthy amount of groups have reunited and are making triumphant returns to Naeba (LCD Soundsystem, The Avalanches); electronic acts lean towards the darker side. READ MORE

  • Radwimps

    Fujirockers English Blog Is Go!


    In today’s latest line-up annoucement Fujirock has confirmed Radwimps onto the bill.  If you’re unfamiliar with the band, they’ve been a fixture of the mainstream Japanese music scene for the past decade, but it was their work on the recent smash movie “Your Name” which has catapulted them to huge success and popularity. READ MORE

  • rookie-a-go-go

    How to Apply for Rookie A Go-Go

    • April 6, 2017 ● Bands


    Outside the main festival gates at Fuji Rock you may find yourself wandering back to your tent, hotel or hostel one summery evening when the sound of a band calls out to you on your left.  Dazed and sweaty from a headline show at the Green Stage, you’re still aching for something else to keep the buzz going, so you follow that sound and step through the mouth of a giant, fiery skull to find yourself at the Rookie A Go-Go stage, a magical musical space which has been showcasing unsigned bands at Fuji Rock since the beginning of this millennium.